Posts Tagged ‘halo’

DIY Ammo Counter

Monday, December 21st, 2015

Do you need an ammo counter circuit for your project and are bummed that you have to wait for a spot in my build queue to open up?  Fret not, here is a step by step how to make one from scratch!

In this guide, I will detail how to build your own ammo counter for ~$25 and with only minimal soldering experience.

 

title

Parts:

You can use other arduinos or switch and display choices.  The linked ones were chosen for number of pins and size.  This project uses 16 IO pins from the arduino and the trinket is the smallest arduino that can be programmed over usb.

If you get a different display, it must have the following traits:

  • Common Cathode, the common pin is ground (do not want Common Anode)
  • Two Single Digit 7 segment displays, with 10 pins on the back EACH.
    - OR -
  • One Dual Digit 7 segment display that is non-multiplexed, with 18-20 pins on the back (multiplexed only has ~10 pins)

Wire Display to Arduino:

Get out your solder iron, wire strippers, and some note paper.

  • Wire display digits 1 and 2 as shown below, diagram only shows one digit for simplicity.
    • The common pin (CC) goes to ground.
    • The period (DP) can be left unwired.
    • Each segment is wired to a unique pin on the arduino, can use any arduino pin marked as D or A.
    • The exact pins wired to are important, write them down for later.  To run the software without modification, use the default pinout table below.
    • Diagram shows resistors between the display and the arduino.  When using the 3.3 volt version of the arduino trinket, no resistors are needed.

 

wiring

 

Default Arduino Pinout

Arduino Trinket I/O Signal Type Name
3 ~3 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment E
4 4 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment D
5 ~5 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment C
6 ~6 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment E
8 8 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment D
9 ~9 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment C
10 ~10 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment B
11 ~11 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment A
12 12 I Switch Input Fire Switch
13 13 I LED Output LED
14 A0 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment F
15 A1 O Display Output Digit 2, Segment G
16 A2 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment B
17 A3 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment A
18 A4 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment F
19 A5 O Display Output Digit 1, Segment G
RST RST I Switch Input Reload Switch

Finish Wiring Assembly:

  • Wire the fire switch to a digital pin and ground.
  • Wire the reload switch to the reset pin (RST) and ground
  • Wire in the trinket to a 3.3 – 5 volt battery pack, blue and white color displays requires minimum of 3.2 volts.

Program Software:

You will need a micro usb cable.  No batteries needed yet, the trinket is powered by the usb for now.

Source Code: codebender.cc/sketch:207738

  1. Follow the getting started guide from codebender to setup the website to talk to your arduino trinket, choose Adafruit Pro Trinket 3V USB when asked
    codebender.cc/static/walkthrough/page/1
  2. Open source code link
  3. Click Run on Arduino
    • If you get the error message, make sure to press the button on the Trinket to activate the bootloader before trying again.

Optional Software Changes

With the source code open on the codebender.cc website, find and click the edit button to make changes to the software.  After you have made changes, click Verify Code and resolve any issues, proceed to ‘Run on Arduino’ when the website indicates ‘Verification successful!’

  1. If you did not use the default pinout, you must update the pinMap list with where you wired each display segment. Use the pin numbers you wrote down
  2. If you want to use a different starting ammo count or firing types, scroll down and update ‘Starting Values’.
    • shotmode can be set to CONT for full auto or BURST for semi auto
    • burst_value is the number of ammo shot in each burst, default is 1.
    • counter_value is the starting ammo value.

Examples:

  • shotmode = BURST; burst_value = 1; counter_value = 99; is used for paintball or nerf
  • shotmode = CONT; burst_value = 1; counter_value = 60; is used to match a Halo AR MA5B
  • shotmode = BURST; burst_value = 3; counter_value = 36; is used to match a Halo BR55

Testing:

On startup, you will see the starting count of MODE1. Press the fire button and the number will go down 1 tick until 0.  The LED (pin 13) goes dark when the counter reads 00.
Press the reload button and the display will go blank, and then reset to the starting count.

Hold the fire button down while pressing reset, this will change between modes. Display will report the mode number as F1, F2, F3, and so on.

Feel free to play with the software further to tweak the features to your liking. Have fun :)

 

Energy Sword 2015

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

This is the new Energy Sword for 2015. Featuring dynamic and reactive lighting, motion activated sound effects, and an internal rechargeable battery. Videos on the bottom of this post show off the lighting and sound effects. I built my original energy sword design with the help of Sean Bradely in 2009.  This work was expanded by Joshua Kane in 2013 / 2014.  I took Joshua’s work to the next level with multiple animation modes with reactive and multi fade lighting. Kudos for the sculpting and paint job still goes to Sean Bradely.

Energy Sword Action Pose

Note: I abandoned the custom circuit that I detailed in a previous post and instead went with inexpensive circuit modules from Adafruit and Sparkfun.

Electronics Part List

Sword Usage

  • While OFF
    • Press button to activate
    • Hold button to enter color selection mode > Press to cycle color modes > Hold to save selection
      • Energy
      • Fire
      • Water
      • Rainbow
  • While ON
    • Press button to extinguish.
    • Hold button to enter animation selection mode > Press to cycle animation modes > Hold to save selection
      • No extra animation
      • Flicker on, Comet Off
      • Flicker off, Comet On
      • Flicker on, Comet On

Note: Additional animations are ignored in Rainbow Color mode

Videos

Ammo Counter Assembly Instructions

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Counter Assembly

DIY assembly guide for the ammo counter.  If you ordered an unassembled circuit kit, this is the instruction page for you.

Assembly order is from the center outward to minimize solder bridges.  Keep some solder removal braid handy to remove any bridges between pads.

BACK OF THE PCB

  1. Install the IC, making sure to orient with pin1 indication on the PCB
  2. Install the three resistors.
    1. 2x 10k on the bottom
    2. 100 ohm on the top
  3. Install the LEDs and bend into position to match your install location.
    1. LED on top center position (unmarked)
    2. LED on bottom marked position.

Note: The LED polarity is not marked on the board. See the wiring section for additional help.
You can also look at the copper traces that connect to the LED socket.  The ground is connected in multiple points.  The positive is connected to a single trace.

  1. Install the capacitor to the top of the PCB.

 

FRONT OF THE PCB

  1. Install the diode, leave the leads long and do not solder yet.
  2. Install the display but do not solder yet.  Orient the same as the graphic 8.8.
  3. Bend the diode down and out of the way of the display.
  4. Solder the display and diode.

WIRING

+---------------------------+
|+-------------------------+|
||  +-----+      +-----+   ||
||  |     |      |     |   ||
||  |     |      |     |   ||
||  +-----+      +-----+   ||
||  |     |      |     |   ||
||  |     |      |     |   ||
||  +-----+ .    +-----+ . ||
|+-------------------------+|
|1 2   3 4   5  -====-  8 9 |
+---------------------------+

+---------------------------+
|           11 10           |
| .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . |
|    =.1uF=          =100=  |
|---------------------------|
|\   ATTINY2313            ||
|/                         ||
|---------------------------|
|  =10k=             =10k=  |
| .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . |
|9 8   7 6    5    4 3   2 1|
+---------------------------+

Signal Name Location Ground
FIRE SWITCH 1. Fire Signal 2. Ground
AMMO AVAILABLE LED 3. LED + 4. Ground
POWER 6. Battery + 7. Ground
RELOAD SWITCH 9. Reset Signal 8. Ground
Top LED (Always ON) 10. LED + 11. Ground
Muzzle Flash 5. FX

 

Note: Power socket overlaps with the diode.  Be careful not to short.

 

TESTING

  1. After connecting power, you should see the display light up with the current clip size.
  2. Press the fire button to decrement the ammo count.
  3. Press the reload button to reset the count.
  4. When the count reaches zero, the Ammo Available LED will turn off.
  5. Additional fire modes are accessed by holding the fire button while pressing reset.  Display will read F1, F2, F3 to indicate the selected fire mode and clip size.  Release the fire button to save your selection.

 

PCB Trace Reference

This section is useful for modification and troubleshooting.  You can see where the trace wires go on the pcb.

Top

Counter_3.11 FRONT_PCB

Bottom

Counter_3.11 BACK_PCB

Reference Pictures

Additional pictures are on flickr.

 

Final assembly.  Shows placement of diode below the display.

Counter Assembly

 

Display is not soldered down yet.  LED leads bent to match install positions. Shows orientation of chip.

Top resistor pictured is 150 ohm, kit includes 100 ohm.

 

Counter Assembly

 

Orientation of display to front

Counter Assembly

New Beginnings – Sword 2014

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Announcing a new sword electronics design and a partnership.

I have been working alone the past years on an updated energy sword circuit design.  Something that would allow me finer control of the LEDs without the burden of soldering the old massive LED arrays.  Details of my 2009 sword design.

Joshua Kane had been working independently on his own sword controller circuit, build completely from arduino modules.  You can see a write-up of his original project here: Stunning Halo 3 Costumes and Energy Sword

The outer shell of our both swords were made by an amazing sculptor named Sean Bradley.  It was through Sean that Josh and I met each other; and beginning last fall, we began working closely to bring an arduino based sword controller to life as a kit.

New Features

  • Motion activated Sound Effects
  • Motion activated Lighting Effects
  • Lighting Animations: Extend, Detract, Pulsate, Flicker, Clash
  • LED arrays are off-the-shelf LED Strips of varying prices and pixel densities from Adafruit.
  • HD MP3 sound effects (and LOUD too, thanks to the built-in amplifier plus speaker)
  • Lastly, this circuit is USB programmable using the Arduino Software as a Leonardo board.

 

Preview of the 2014 sword circuit

sword2014

Another thing to note on this circuit board is the accelerometer chip on the back.  Wow, is that guy tiny!  Putting my hot air rework station to good use to get that guy soldered.

 

New Sound Options in the Store

Friday, May 18th, 2012

I often get asked about offering sound functionality in my prop kits that I sell. As demonstrated by my energy sword design I had a solution for sound, but it was not a solution that I could extend to my cheaper kits. Sound is hard, not just hard but expensive. Till now.

Introducing the 300 second USB recording module from <a href=”http://www.electronics123.com/300-second-usb-recording-module.html”>electronics123.com</a>. I have fully inregrated their sound module into the Backlit Ammo Counter offered in my store via an adapter circuit. The sound module can also be used stand alone, but you do not need me for that, go buy one from Electronics123! They are good folks.

The need for the Adapter Circuit

The sound quality offered by this sound module hits a sweet spot in cost to performance. In addition, the level of programmability at this price level is unmatched. The only function that cannot be programmed is to switch between two sounds based on a second input. I want to hear the firing sounds only when ammo is available, and the dry fire sounds only when ammo is not available. This is where the adapter circuit comes in. The backlit ammo counter already reports via the bottom LED if ammo is available or not. The adapter circuit takes the signal from that LED and the FIRE switch and performs some logic to decide which sound to play.

Is that simple, now the sound module gives sound effects exactly as expected for a fully automated weapon. Options for semi-automatic are in progress.

Secondary Announcement

New configuration options for the Ammo Counter in the store! Custom rates of fire. Prior to now all Fully-Automatic Ammo Counters have had the same fire rate of 5000 rounds per minute. Which is crazy fast for the most popular selection, the Halo AR having a fire rate of 600rpm.

Cortana Prop Circuit

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Project is a cortana prop. Partnered with James Hodson and friends to complete. My portion is complete. Have a circuit board here that is the size and shape of the Halo Data Crystal (the thing that can contain an AI such as Cortana).

What is a Data Crystal Chip? Please see the Halo Wiki [halo.wikia.com].

Feature set:

  • Circuit board is designed to look like a naked “cortana” data chip.
  • Board can be placed in a molded outer shell to be more accurate. More details to come.
  • Compatible with multiple power sources depending on final usage:
    • LiPo cell (internal shell design)
    • Alkaline (wired to slot connector)
    • USB (wired to slot connector)
  • Can be plugged into a matching slot connector for power up
  • Slot connector can be used to power up other suit lights. Inserting the board into the slot is like flipping a switch on.
  • Micro-controller chip is on the circuit board to animate the lights.

Source Code

http://pastebin.com/UwkeFcpJ

Status

04-26-2011

Working hard on the next stage of the project: Make a plastic shell that houses the circuit and a battery (team jlhR2).
Link to post: [405th Forum]

Video demo of using the cortana chip as a switch

04-18-2011

PCB order is in, could mass produce a few right now if I wanted.
Link to post: [405th Forum]

04-06-2011

First prototype is fully assembled, ready to proceed to stage 3 on the schedule.
Link to post: [405th Forum]

03-22-2011

A nice explanation of all that the cortana board can do.
Link to post: [405th Forum]

03-21-2011

First few revisions of the circuit board have been assembled and tested. Slot connector works great~! I ran out of those tiny smd LEDs and ordered some more. Will get one completely assembled later this week.
Link to post: [405th Forum]

Bringing in the latest pictures and videos to page 1.

02-03-2011

I am still working on a final draft of the main board design, but here is the gist of what it will do and look like: First, the size is tiny. The thing is as small as the real deal, 1.00×1.85 inches (25×47 mm).

JlhR2 and I are still working on a pep template / mold that will go over the top.

Guide: Weapon Counter Display Overlay

Monday, August 9th, 2010

Took a lot of trial and error, but I think I came up with a method to make a display overlay that I can be proud of.  Thanks for the help James Hodson(jlhR2).




Click More Info for the full guide.


The overlay is meant to go on top of my ammo counters, but also looks good when used alone with a light behind it.  The overlay is made of several transparency sheets layered atop one another plus a sheet of tracing paper toact as a diffuser.  Could probably substitute tissue paper.

The image files to print out are below. You will need to re-size the images to fit your weapon before printing.  If printing at home, be sure to buy transparency sheets meant for ink-jet printing and not laser printing.Ink-jet printable transparency sheets have a rough surface to print onto.

I find my photo printers T-Shirt Transfer mode gives the best print out.  It takes some trial and error, but set the Print Quality to high for best results.

Halo Reach

Click Picture to download full size

Halo General Purpose – James Hodson (jlhR2)

Download full size here:http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=40126522@N04&q=display%20overlay


There will be four layers, from bottom to top there is the tracing paper,two black transparencies, and the color transparency.

The tracing paper and the black transparencies need to be cut so the numbercan shine through (xacto knife).  If not using an ammo counter circuit, youmay cut in whatever number you like.

DO NOT cut the color layer transparency.  This is what colors any light shining through to the proper hue.  It also makes photographs when unlit look amazing.

Tip: I first cut a piece of paper the size of the hole I wanted then taped it down so I could have something to trace with the knife.

Below are pictures of building up the different layers. In these photos onlya single layer of black is used.  You can see that the light gets through a bit in areas that are supposed to be black.  This is why we use two layers ofblack.

Clear tape is used to hold the layers together and keep them aligned.

Have fun~!